30 Life Lessons I've Learned in 30 Years Part Two Featured Image with Black Woman Outside Looking

30 Life Lessons I’ve Learned in 30 Years – Part Two

This week, my lessons for life focus on living your best life and learning to love others. If you missed part one of this three part series, check out 30 Life Lessons I’ve Learned in 30 Years (Part One) now!

  1. Live your truth, there’s no time in life to fake it.

If you’re a blerd, prefer to eat versus exercise, enjoy sci-fi over reality TV, or books over movies; love it, accept it, be who you are, and how you feel like being you. As long as you aren’t hurting anyone else, be you to the fullest extent! Discover, develop and celebrate you! Continue reading

30 Life Lessons I've Learned in 30 Years Part One Featured Image with Black Woman Outside Reading

30 Life Lessons I’ve Learned in 30 Years – Part One

I’ve been on this earth for three decades – over 360 months, 1,500 weeks and 11,000 days. Over this time, I’ve learned some lessons about life, faith and love, and I feel like I learned the most in the last year of my 20s. I want to share 30 truths that I have come to know about being human, a Black woman, an introvert and having a relationship with God; some of which have come easy to me and others I’ve had to fight to understand. Here’s part one of a three-part series (of 10 lessons each) sharing the wisdom I carry with me each day. Continue reading

10 Words to Affirm Self-Love Featured Image with Black Woman in Sandles I Love You

10 Words to Affirm Self-Love

For most of my life, I’ve struggled with the way I look. I remember sitting in my parent’s bedroom as a child, on their bed, crying and asking, begging God to do a miracle and make my skin lighter.

When I woke up the next morning and looked in the mirror I was angry, sad and irritated. God knew the pain I experienced because of my chocolate, melanin-rich, sun-kissed skin. He made me this way and saw the way people teased me, called me ugly and how awkward I felt. He made me this way and He refused to change it.

I didn’t understand it and I refused to accept it. I grew up in a predominately white neighborhood, and at the time there were only one or two Black families around (including mine). Continue reading